ZendService\Google\Gcm

ZendService\Google\Gcm

Introduction

ZendService\Google\Gcm provides a client for the Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) API`. ZendService\Google\Gcm\Client allows you to send data from servers to your Android Applications on Android devices (Google API driven).

In order to leverage GCM you must create your project in the Google API Console and enable the GCM service on your device. To get started with GCM prior to building out the 3rd-party server please see GCM: Getting Started

The service is composed of 3 distinct parts:

  • The Client: ZendService\Google\Gcm\Client
  • The Message: ZendService\Google\Gcm\Message
  • The Response: ZendService\Google\Gcm\Response

The Client is the broker that sends the message to the GCM server and returns the response. The Message is where you define all of the message specific data that you would like to send. The response is the feedback given back from the GCM server on success, failures and any new canonical id’s that must be updated.

Quick Start

In order to send messages; you must have your API key ready and available. Here we will setup the client and prepare ourselves to send out messages.

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use ZendService\Google\Gcm\Client;
use ZendService\Google\Gcm\Message;
use ZendService\Google\Exception\RuntimeException;

$client = new Client();
$client->setApiKey('the-api-key-for-gcm');

So now that we have the client setup and available, it is time to define out the message that we intend to send to our registration id’s that have registered for push notifications on our server. Note that many of the methods specified are not required but are here to give an inclusive look into the message.

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$message = new Message();

// up to 100 registration ids can be sent to at once
$message->setRegistrationIds(array(
    '1-an-id-from-gcm',
    '2-an-id-from-gcm',
));

// optional fields
$message->setData(array(
    'pull-request' => '1',
));
$message->setCollapseKey('pull-request');
$message->setRestrictedPackageName('com.zf.manual');
$message->setDelayWhileIdle(false);
$message->setTimeToLive(600);
$message->setDryRun(false);

Now that we have the message taken care of, all we need to do next is send out the message. Each message comes back with a set of data that allows us to understand what happened with our push notification as well as throwing exceptions in the cases of server failures.

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try {
    $response = $client->send($message);
} catch (RuntimeException $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage() . PHP_EOL;
    exit(1);
}
echo 'Successful: ' . $response->getSuccessCount() . PHP_EOL;
echo 'Failures: ' . $response->getFailureCount() . PHP_EOL;
echo 'Canonicals: ' . $repsonse->getCanonicalCount() . PHP_EOL;
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